Fight the EU copyright reform! EDIT: We lost

#61

More than 2k went to the demonstration today, it was great! Very impressive to bring that up in just two days.
Funny note: The media was complaining that the organization happened so quickly, they could not manage to come. But I got some news for you: The Internet does not need the slow press. That was what we were demonstrating for: Our expression, our communication and our content.

Here is a stream of the demonstration if you want to see it. It is german but you still get an idea of the thing.

Around 20k were watching it live. Can’t wait for the March protest day.

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The Forum Gallery V3
#62

In Belgium this just made the news. Hoping for a public outcry!

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#63

Just now the European Council, which includes all European governments, voted in favor of the copyright reform. Including Germany of which Barley, our justice minister, broke the coalition agreement with this action despite being the same person who recieved the 4.7 million petition yesterday during a press event. She even said she is personally against upload filters. GRRRR

The only countries that voted against it are the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Poland, Italy and Finland. :netherlands: :luxembourg: :poland: :it: :finland:

This means we have exactly one chance left to stop this mess. The final vote late March/early April. We need to go on the streets at the 23rd of March. I try to find a more updated map as the one I posted earlier seems to not be used by all states.

Meanwhile, during the international security conference in Munich the idea was spoken out to criminalize users of the Darknet. Fuck, I will so much use that if you force me to. And I make sure to inform others how to use it.

EDIT: Apparently there are some more votings before the last one but these seem to be not really important as a way to stop it.

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#64

@Urben I think you need to link or show a BEFORE and AFTER table to let the rest of us understand all these articles and flowcharts…

I think I know some gist of the problem but to be honest it is a bit hard to follow.

EDIT: Layman’s description of the issue:

Basically, for example, making a Rick-Roll will now be a very complex process…

That said, I think for parties that expressly state they will not hamper public use of images and audio - as is the current case with HITMAN and HITMAN 2 as per IOI - then the inconvenience I think is more in that YouTube would have to require IOI to put that in writing.

The result, after all that paperwork would be remarkably the same as before. We would still be able to upload Videos of HITMAN playthroughs and runs, but whether you can do that for FORTNITE or other games would depend on whether that Developer/Publisher allows it.

Unless I am missing something here.

#65

I try to make the changes obvious on YouTube’s example:

Current situation:

Artists can come at Google to say how they want content with their work being handled. Their “Content ID” system tries to detect these works and apply their demands. Like being monetarized, not being available in certain countries, or being made silent in some cases.

Upcoming situation:

Google cannot wait until artists come at them, Google has to get licenses of every artist existing before it can allow content to be made accessible with these works. Google is loosing it’s “provider privilege”, which means, as a plattform provider not the users are responsible for user-generated-content anymore but Google is. This leads into copyright protection measurements being more extreme. For example having a coke in your Video? That is Coca-Cola’s logo. Google has to sign a contract with them before allowing you to upload this. How Google knows you have someone’s logo and not your own in the video? Who knows.

Sure Coca Cola has nothing against that you’d think. But Imagine Their workers do a strike and upload a video of it to make it go viral. Oh it contains the Coke logo? Oh Coca Cola does not wish the logo being used in this context? Upload blocked.

Let’s Plays should be quite safe, every sane developer want’s people post them for reach of their game. Well except Nintendo. They are stupid in that regard. Anyway, this should be safe as long you don’t edit music or memes into it. Because that gets tricky. See below.

In any case even the advanced “Content ID” system has to be massively updated, which probably results into more “false-positives”. Currently, it can only detect copyrighted audio, but not video or text.

General problem with Uploadfilters

Google’s Content ID is not working flawlessly. There are falsely detected works with takedowns. You don’t hear of it because - well - you can’t as it is not online. But affected people write about it elsewhere. For now just believe me this is the case.
The directive allows Parody, Quotes and stuff. But how does a filter detect that? DIstinguish it from actual infringements? They can’t. And to make sure the plattform is not getting trouble, they rather block this content to be safe.

Outside of Google…

… Every plattform that is older than 3 years has to do the very same what is expected from Google. Which means they have to develop the same advanced filters. Which they won’t do. Because it costs much. Content ID cost 60M$ so far. Instead, they need to acquire filter software. Which surely costs thousands as well.
Soo plattforms which cannot rent them die as well.
This filter software you’d rent most likely comes from… Google. Which means you are always existing only because Google allows you to. Nice isn’t it?

I expect this is only true for sites hosted within the EU. Hitmanforum isn’t affected then. However, depending on multilateral trade agreements, this can change.

Summary:

So paperwork does not get complicated. It gets outright ridiculous and far away from reality. Europe is about to destroy all European Internet content that allows users to upload stuff or write comments. Only monopolistic plattforms could exist. Which is ironic because all of them are US companies.

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#66

This is true. In principle they are trying to mimic regulations of TV. This is why when you watch the news or something sometimes someone’s T-Shirt is watermarked or covered in pixels.

But TV the “uploads” are not in the thousands… Each program or telecast is curated and it is possible to sort decisions on copyright well before airdates or to watermark images on the fly.

On YouTube or internet it would be a challenge to do it without significantly slowing down everything or as you mention, surrendering to crazy Autofilter AI.

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#67

If I had a plattform outside the EU I would say “sorry Europeans, IP range ban it is. Also, here is a list of VPNs I share for absolute no related reason.” :wink:

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#68

That is another thing… I think it is more the impracticality of it. And I don’t know how this works in Europe, but here in Philippines the laws are really strict on paper but almost nothing is enforced (including white collar crime) without a Complainant.

So our version of this law would have no effect for years unless someone had something against you like what happened to Rappler over Cyber-libel.

So I am not sure if maybe the use of this law… from its sheer scale will not just naturally become selective anyway. Because it works against the interest of Google to delay or restrict uploads of users or to frustrate the experience of audiences.

Also your Coke example. I think Coca Cola can already do what you describe in the current system…

#69

That is a good call, but that would mean you need to rely that your EU country is breaking laws by not putting it into a law. Which wouldn’t even be unusual, Germany did not put at least 15 directives into law. But we have to pay many fines each time the EU knocks at our door.

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#70

So I guess it’s two things:

  1. This must be opposed on grounds that it is impractical and actually unenforceable.

  2. If it passes unopposed people will demonstrate how impractical and unenforceable it is…by use of VPN’s etc… methods that cannot be traced to platform owners.

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#71

Yeah something like that. Another option I see is to go into the Darknet. There people don’t have to be anonymous, since the gain is the plattform owners are. That way they can ignore the reform and allow people to post stuff however they like there. Because the responsibility is explicitly put at the plattform owner with the loss of the provider privilege. Users doing this would not even do something illegal then.

But the Darknet is quite slower. And the current users mostly use it for black market. So videos are a no-go currently, and you will have to be around shady people. Well unless many follow you there.

#72

The return of the “Speakeasy”? Man… talk about Back to the Future!

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#73

Today was another demonstration in Cologne, almost forgot to go. :smiley:

Last week it was 2k people, today it was roughly 4k and it was very loud! I was on quite some demonstrations now but this one was never quiet. Very nice.

Here is a video which tries to capture a large part of it:
https://twitter.com/kessemak2/status/1099291687011172352

Also we had very informative signs:
grafik

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#74

LONG LIVE THE NETHERLANDS

This body isn’t unclear at all…

#75

Nothing exactly new, but it seems like many social media campaigns are started at least in Germany to support the reform. It is worth to follow them and post comments under them with counterarguments.

Anyway, I want to share a website that was recently made. On it MEPs can promise to vote against the reform. So far only 23 have signed it. The parliament is made of 751. Still nice to have something more solid than “Yeah I will think about it”.

EDIT: Boy they go all-out now. A huge number of german groups teamed up. Just look at that number and believe me there are quite some big names in it: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D0Q201HWkAA-uej.jpg

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#76

The whole matter is too complicated still? Or you cannot make your relatives understand it? Here is a simple video which is really well made.

The audio is german sadly, but you can activate english subtitles!

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#77

Wtf are we living in China by now?

The European Parliament did not yet do the final vote. It did not yet decide on if it is a good idea or if it is dangerous to the Internet.

AND YET the European Parliament themselves wrote this: “The Copyright Directive: how the mob was told to save the dragon and slay the knight” earlier and now tweeted this:

Your memes are safe :raised_hands: Freedom of expression is not affected :ok_hand: It’s all about fair payment to content creators :euro:
https://twitter.com/Europarl_EN/status/1100697243521294336

They even wrote an article on their own website about that message:


They are not even trying to stay neutral until the vote is over.
Note how the balloon looks like the EFF logo, a US digital-rights NGO that is strictly against this reform.

The German translation even implies the vote did already happen.

They fight so dirty for this, it is hard to keep up the European spirit. I am seriously angry about this. They no longer gamble on the youth’s culture, but on the European idea itself.

#78

Just in, HELP NEEDED:

The EVP group currently tries to change the date of the vote before the day of demonstration!
Many groups worked towards making that day the biggest impact possible to show how many people are against this reform.

These are the leaders of the political groups:

PLEASE help by contact them and tell them to be against an earlier vote in respect of the announced day of protest!

#79

Around ten spontanous demonstrations were organized throughout the night and happened just this afternoon. I was again in Cologne, around 1k were there, I guess 5-10k were on the streets in total.

The result was that Manfred Weber, the guy who requested an early vote, gave a TV statement that the vote will be end of March, like it was intended.

However, it can be that this was not because of us, but because the translations of the refom could not be finished in time. In case that plan of an early vote still gets voted on, that will happen on Thursday. S&D already said to vote against that in case.
Still it was great how many came to demonstrate this reform and the attempt of an early vote. :slight_smile:

It feels good to be powerful enough that they try to screw us, and powerful enough that they retreat from this plan as well.

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#80

Wow.

The EPP group tried again to pull the vote to an earlier point. But no other group supported them at this so they finally dropped it.

Interesting note, Julia Reda, the MEP who keeps us all informed, leaked this attempt. She had to delete the tweet to implement the request, to only make the result of the meeting public.

Too bad this is the Internet and someone did a screenshot of it. Awww :joy:

EDIT: Half an hour later, #Lügenmanni (LiesManni) is trending on #1 on Twitter. How a shame that’d be if this costs him the precious candidacy as the European Commission President!!1