Shadow of the Tomb Raider


#21

They need to return to the good stuff then. Not going to suck up to a game that has lost all of its identity. Need to address and identify that this is not Tomb Raider, just another project with the IP title stuck on.

That is the industry trying to be greedy, turning them all into shitty PvP or “services” (Look at Ubisoft, every game has a season event and yearly Pass now.)

The answer to everything is in the predecessors, hence how they got this far in the first place. The game is nothing to do with tomb raider.


#22

they don’t “need” to do shit just because you said so, this is a new take on the character whether you like it or not (and clearly people do like it, considering this is the third)


#23

Oh, dear. You’re going to be in for a world of disappointment when you grow up. I’m guessing that you’ve never seen a real woman without make-up. If you’re ready for a hard dose of reality, then do a search: “women without makeup”. And what do you think Tomb Raider is about? “Glamour” is not something a woman who is fighting to stay alive in a hostile environment would prioritise.


#24

This new interpretation of Lara Croft is so unlikeable. Based on the trailer they’re continuing with the boring themes of this reboot series. The trailer is even called “the end of the beginning”, heh.


#25

I also read at another source that there are separate difficulty settings for combat and puzzles in the Options menu. I wonder how difficulty is going to be incorporated into solving puzzle segments, if they were to be similar to Rise of the Tomb Raider ones.


#26

And recently god of war


#27

There was an interesting short segment in This Week on Xbox (a weekly show with all the latest Xbox news from the official Xbox team). They interviewed a couple of the team developing Shadow of the Tomb Raider. I’ve set the video to play at the point of interest.

To be honest, I don’t think the next video gives much away that we haven’t already seen in the trailer, but Xbox On, who attended the event and had some hands on experience, did a short analysis video.

[edit]
I forgot to add this video from Maka. He shares some interesting insights into the game from the reveal event.


[/edit]

#28

Interesting! So puzzles are going to be deadly if approached or completed incorrectly. I guess that’s probably where the puzzle-specific difficulty setting comes into play.


#29

If they want to fail their roots and whole reason they’ve got this far. These days some are designed in advance, hence this knackered trilogy. There’s plenty of 10 year plans made in franchises and new IPs these days. As I said, this should be the last of the fake crybaby Lara since it’s new motto.

You fail to separate subjective comments to factual changes of the franchise. Once again, whether you or I or anyone likes/dislikes it is irrelevant. (To a point - sales etc) Just like Resi Evil, Ghost Recon, they have dumped their foundations.

What are you talking about? Your assumptions are incorrect and how does a woman with no makeup and a CGI character have any revelation to each other. Makeup doesn’t disguise a manly jaw line. Maybe you should ask yourself the question you asked me. So I take it you would say the exact same to every person that complained about 47’s baby facial features before release? Lmao.


#30

I miss the old Lara, played Underworld recently and I loved how much attention to the games was put. Her acrobatics are damn sexy as hell, just like her confidence. I suck at using her but I’m sure there are master’s of the game that do some pretty neat tricks with her moves. Very open and impressive controls. Gun combat is a bit clunky but it’s functional. Climbing is really fun and the creatures she encounters are pretty well done.

I played the 2013 reboot first tho. At the time i thought it was a bit generic but fun. Once I played Underworld, I could tell why so many people disliked it.

Also I hate the whole “realistic approach.” Video games aren’t made to resemble real life, they’re supposed to be a fantasy, so that nonsense is out the window. The whole she had to have this more realistic survival mentality. Seriously? You know what made Lara a badass? Her ability to be a confident and impressive explorer.
Not a whiney person.

Also I love the “realism” of all the uncharted explosions and crashes she survives…yeah right.

It’s sad seeing what happened with the companies that made Tomb Raider and Hitman. Now we get reboots that aren’t terrible, just not amazing like they should’ve been.


#31

I’d argue that if anything the rebooted Tomb Raider games are equally as unrealistic (if not even more so) than the older games. This is an issue of tone maybe, not necessarily one of realism.


#32

Seriously, who gives a fuck? Why are you going around policing whether characters are considered feminine enough by your own weird standards? This is honestly up there with 47s “feminine hands” as a complete non issue.


#33

obviously he expects them to pay tribute to the originals by making her a supermodel with big tits, god


#34

Th developers purposefully changed the whole formula to present hee as more realistic. It’s been stated before.


#35

And personally I think they’ve done an amazing job at doing that.

In Survivor you felt that you were on that journey that took a young woman from innocence to acting in ways that she could never imagined. Rise continued that journey. The struggles were just as great, but this time Lara was more confident. It all felt very believable.

In Shadow Lara has now grown to become a smart, powerful, and formidable person. But driven by revenge, and fully capable of swift and fearless killing, she is going to have to face the question “Just because I can, should I?” Will it consume and define her or can she be a better person?

I’m absolutely loving it and I can’t wait to continue in this epic adventure.


#36

For me, Rise of the Tomb Raider was one of the few games that did not get boring, and made me consistently get back into the game later after previous sessions.

Reading about how Shadow is similar to Rise, I can’t wait for it to launch.


#37

I don’t see what is realistic about fighting undead Samurai on an island so supernatural it is impossible to leave. Or if you are referring to the climbing and physics and survivalist, I don’t see what is so realistic about that either because you are essentially falling down and defying gravity the entire time.


#38

I prefer the older one. To me, Lara’s strong confidence is what made her characrer. It was to Lara what lack of mercy was to 47.
Her character didn’t have much development but it did emphasize other things, her adventures felt like she was tackling obstacles that would otherwise be impossible for anyone else. Wish there were more games like that, perfect blend of puzzle and action.


#39

https://uproxx.com/viral/the-tomb-raider-reboot-is-more-realistic-with-japanese-monsters/

Her character becomes a survivalist, instead of being the powerful person she becomes an average person who manages to fight back. The old Lara was unstoppable.


#40

I suspect that you’re remembering the older game with fond, but false memories. Don’t get me wrong, the reboot of Tomb Raider owes its very existence to the Core team from back in 1996, and what they did at the time with the technology at their disposal was incredible. However, there is simply no comparison with the older versions and the new ones. Discovering Lara’s origins has been incredible and has given us a character that we have become invested in.

The link with a road in Derby, England is probably of no interest, but if you’re interested in the background to the game, then this video is really interesting and gives you some great insights into the history of the game:


(Note that this video was published in 2016, so has no reference to Shadow.)

As for what the original was like, here is Johnny Chiodini from Eurogamer who never played the original as a child. In this video he experiences it for the first time with Aoife Wilson (who during game play realised that she was remembered it differently from her own childhood):