Violent Video Game Tax *United States*


#1

Good Evening,

I wanted to bring this to the attention of the Community members who live in the United States. It seems that our government wants to put a 10% sales tax on games rated M 17+. This 10% sales tax would be going towards School Shooting Prevention and such, but the reasoning behind it doesn’t justify the sales tax. Our government and of course a select group of people still believe video games create violent people which are proven to be scientifically and psychologically false. They are targeting the Gaming Industry specifically because it’s easy to point fingers and because the industry, of course, is one of the leading sources of entertainment.

Now if this tax is implemented and I’m using my sales tax for Pennsylvania which is 6% so in total it is of course 16%. I’m gonna do some quick math so bear with me.

$60 (Retail Price for AAA Game in the USA at Release)
+
$9.60 (16% Sales Tax)

Total: 69.60

$99.99 (Price for AAA Gold/Ultimate Editions)
+
15.99 (16% Sales Tax)

Total: $115.99

I’m making this thread to make the community members who are from the USA to be aware that our State Government are pushing for this to happen.


#2

Wow, wasn’t aware of this, thanks for the info. I find it hard to believe there are people who still believe violent video games are the cause of shooters/criminals. Sure, there may have been some of them who played such games, and cited that as the reasoning behind their actions, but by and large I don’t believe that’s the case. With all the chaos Grand theft auto caused back in the early 2000’s, I would have thought we would have put this behind us by now, but apparently not.


#3

I don’t doubt your claim but by chance can you post a link or article?


#4

Why don’t they just tax guns and/or ammo! Jefferson (probably) never wrote a rule against doing that.


#5

As far as I can tell, Pennsylvania is pushing for this but it doesn’t look federal.


#6

They once had a “sugar tax” in Chicago and a few other places where stores would charge extra for any drink or junk food that had high amounts of sugar in it. They claimed it was a way to try and cut down on obesity. Luckily enough people called bullshit on that and the sugar tax ended shortly afterwards. Hopefully the same can be true of this.


#7

#8

Pennsylvania is currently pushing it, but chances are it will spread to other State Governments.


#9

We don’t even know if it will pass in Pennsylvania, so I’d like to see what happens there before we start talking about this on a national level.


#10

They call it a fucking “sin tax” but they don’t say shit about movies, TV shows, books or comics also committing this “sin”. Although that might be just a matter of time.


#11

Well there is some computer lingo they might understand:SINTAX ERROR


#12

We don’t know, but I’m trying to make people aware of this situation solely because of the probability of the whole matter. We have more non-gamers than gamers. And with us being in a world where Active Shooter is more rampant especially in the United States people who don’t actually play games are gonna push for this to happen due to how disconnected they are. So we have men and woman in suits up in Harrisburg who chances are our disconnected and will push for this to happen. It’s one of those situations whereby population were are extremely outnumbered and need to voice our opinion for how ludicrous the context is. So I’m looking at this with the probability that if we don’t voice our concern this can potentially be put into action.


#13

Because Gaming is an easy target. It’s just a bunch of disconnected men and woman in suits who haven’t picked up a console game since the original Super Mario Bros. The second a kid shoots up a school they instantly blame it on gaming when they don’t contribute the ideas of mental health and the overall environment they lived in. I’ve been playing Violent Games since Halo 3 came out and at the time I was Seven and I turned out fine and overall successful with a Leadership Position at my Job. Again its just men and woman in suits who are disconnected and don’t know what they are talking about.


#14

Good day to be an Aussie. I read in an economics book somewhere that there was no clear correlation between video game violence and real life, but I guess it is a bit of an easy target and way to rake in cash. It’s like in Australia how some areas are now 30 zones on the road. I feel as though that makes things more dangerous but will get a lot of speeding ticket revenue.


#15

I though we already had 30 zones? Then again I don’t drive so I don’t have a clue.


#16

I think 30 zones are generally stupid as, and I may as well be walking. There starting to be introduced outside of the city, so it’s more prevalent than before.


#17

Well your city you are from Brisbane if I recall correctly (God I hope so) and I live in Adelaide so it might be a QLD thing.


#18

I highly doubt it will pass in Pennsylvania, let alone go federal.


#19

It’s entirely hard to tell right now. I plant a seed of doubt just from demographics alone hence why I’m making people aware of this. Chances are it won’t go federal like controversies such as net neutrality which is a whole slew of problems that was eventually settled, but since State Gov’s can push for the taxation of these type of things. Unfortunately, I wish I could say this won’t pass, but again these are men and woman in suits who are disconnected and overall demographics of gamers/non-gamers with of course more non-gamers than gamers alongside with the whole pushing for safer schools because shootings and such people are gonna see that as an opportunity for agendas to be pushed especially since people who think games cause violence haven’t thoroughly played a violent game. So I just view it as a possibility rather than concluding right away.


#20

I just don’t see how it can pass. The precedent was set when the US Supreme Court ruled that video games were protected by the first amendment. They overruled a 2005 Californian law that banned the sale of violent video games to minors for that reason.

Not convinced they’ll have any better luck in Pennsylvania.