Differences in Mission Names

I´ve created this Topic years ago on the old Forum, but since its gone now, i decided to recreate it here.
In the german Localisation of the old Games some of the Mission Names were changed, for unkown Reasons and i thought i share them here with you, using this Key:

Original Mission Name = german Mission Name = Translation of the german Name

Silent Assassin

St. Petersburg Stakeout = Attentat in St. Petersburg = Assassination in St. Petersburg

Kirov Park Meeting = Verabredung im Park = Appointment in the Park

Tubeway Torpedo = Die letzte Metro = The last Metro/Subway

Invitation to a Party = Ein ungebetener Partygast = An uninvited Partyguest

Tracking Hayamoto = Wo ist Hayamoto? = Where´s Hayamoto?

Shogun Showdown = Tod dem Shogun = Death to the Shogun

Basement Killing = Tod im Keller = Death in the Basement

The Jacuzzi Job = Im Whirlpool = In the Whirlpool

Tunnel Rat = Durch die Stollen = Through the Tunnels

Terminal Hospitality = Endstation Krankenhaus = Final Destination: Hospital

St. Petersburg Revisited = Der Kreis schließt sich = The Circle closes


Hitman Contracts

The Lee Hong Assassination = Lee Hongs Ende = Lee Hongs End


Blood Money

A Vintage Year = Erntezeit = Harvest Season

Curtains Down = Der letzte Akt = The final Act

Flatline = Checken Sie aus? = Do you check out? (like from a Hotel)

A new Life = Ein neuer Anfang = A new Beginning

Murder of the Crows = Spiel mir den Blues = Play me the Blues

You better watch out = Schöne Bescherung = A nice Mess (Bescherung is also the Act of giving/receiving Christmas Presents in Germany)

House of Cards = Nichts geht mehr = Nothing goes anymore (like when playing Roulette, you cant place a bet anymore when the Ball starts rolling)

A Dance with the Devil = Hörst du die Englein singen? = Do you hear the (little) Angels sing? (Thats my personal Favorite by the Way)

Amendment XXV = Paragraph 47 = Paragraph 47


Thats it, since Absolution they´ve sticked to the original Names. How do you like them?
And, even more interesting to me:

How are they called in your native Language?

18 Likes

Wonder why they bothered to change the mission names in the first place :thinking:
They’re mostly good, some of the SA names are kinda meh though, Assassination in…, Appointment in… :yawning_face:

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Yeah some of them are quite lame, but I love Do you hear the Angels sing? and Harvest Season and The Circle closes are way better than the original names.

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And this goes to show that Hitman Contracts was perfect so they didn’t need to change much.

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I put the mission where the mission names are altered between French and English

Contracts

Asylum Aftermath = Une Histoire de Dingues = A story about fools (a mix between “une histoire de dingue” a crazy story and “dinguesinsane persons).

The Meat King’s Party = Abattoir Numéro 2 = Slaughterhouse Number 2

Rendezvous in Rotterdam = Du Rififi à Rotterdam = Rumble in Rotterdam

Deadly Cargo = Dézingueurs en pagaille = Messy “killers” (“dézingueurs” is an old slang word in French, describing more men engaged in a massive shootout or a shoot-them-up).

Traditions of the Trade = Conférence explosive = Blasting conference (“explosive” can also mean mindblowing or impressive in French in figurative sense).

Slaying a Dragon = La mort du Dragon = The Death of the Dragon

The Wang Fou Incident = Embuscade au Wang-Fou = Ambush at Wang Fou

The Seafood Massacre = Un Gros Poisson = A big Fish (“un gros poisson” also means in French an important guy, a bigwig).

The Lee Hong Assassination = La mort de Lee Hong = Lee Hong’s Death

Hunter and Hunted = Traqueur traqué = Tracked tracker (means in French the same thing as English, “un traqueur” is someone hunting something).

Blood Money

Original Mission Name = French Mission Name = Translation of the French Name

A Vintage Year = Un Cru Stupéfiant = An amazing vintage
(wordplay with “stupéfiant” where it is also used in French to describe a drug).

Curtains Down = Dernier Acte = The Last Act (final part of a movie or theatre)

Flatline = Droit dans le Mur = Straight to the Wall (in a sense of “racing blindly to the wall”).

A New Life = Un Nouveau Départ = A New Start (keeps the same sense)

The Murder of Crows = Espèce menacée = Endangered Species

You Better Watch Out = Aux Aguets = “Stay Alert”

Till Death Do Us Part = Jusqu’à ce que la Mort… = Till Death… (I think that French expression is too long to fit on the screen - “Jusqu’à ce que la mort nous sépare”)

A Dance with the Devil = Une Danse endiablée = A frenzied dance (based on the fact that “endiablée” comes from “diable” Devil).

Amemdment XXV = 25e Amemdement = 25th Amemdment

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Uh, i like that one! Thanks for adding those, very interesting :relaxed:

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Where in the World is Carmen Hayamoto?

There are far too many Final Destinations

Technically the circle doesn’t close in St.PR though…

I mean get it if altering some of the wording or maybe something like Amendment XXV where the Americanism is obscure but a lot of these seem unnecessary.

1 Like

Just wait till you hear what the germans do with movie titles… Still one of the worst “translation” was for “Fast Times at Ridgemont High”. Known here as “Ich glaub’, ich steh’ im Wald”. Roughly translated to “I think I’m standing in the forest”.

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Oh I know what you Europeans do to movie titles and it baffles me.

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Well St Petersburg is the first Contract he did for Sergeij, and he then went back there to kill him - even when it turns out to be a setup.

But you are correct

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Yeah I figured Germans would add some of their flavor to the titles. I always chuckle when I see a movie title in German, it’s often times
The Original English title: Some German tagline like for example
Trainspotting: Neue Helden

In Russian almost all the mission names are pretty much the same except for
A Vintage Year = Урожайный год = A Harvest Year
and
Curtains Down = За кулисами = Behind the Curtains

These changes are due to the fact that the original titles translated directly don’t sound that good so they had to be adapted.

But there’s no such term as „Flatline“ in Russian so they translated it to „A running line“ = «Бегущая волна», no idea what that means.

6 Likes

Perhaps the answer is here :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=flatline